Data

Metaphor Table for 13 Trump Public Speeches

(Instructions on how to read the table below)

 

Metaphor Table: Our empirical discourse analysis is based on locating and interpreting the conceptual metaphors that appear in a text. To preclude one source of interpretive bias, “cherry picking”(which occurs when an analysis is built around an eye-catching metaphor that is representative of the corpus), our team comprehensively reviewed and systematically coded all the many hundreds of text instances, or ‘tokens,’ of the conceptual metaphors occurring in the President’s discourse.

Speech: To the left of the metaphor table, we labeled the speeches by date starting with the year, followed by the month and day. Every date under the column “Speech” is representative of one of the thirteen randomly selected speeches.

  • 150616: Donald Trump Announces Candidacy for President in New York

  • 150705: Trump on Mexico Comments: ‘I Can’t Apologize for the Truth,’ interview on Fox News’ “Media Buzz”

  • 160823: Remarks at Luedecke Arena in Austin, Texas

  • 160917: Donald Trump at the Remembrance Project Luncheon at the Omi Houston Hotel at Westside in Houston, Texas

  • 161005: Remarks at Henderson Pavilion in Henderson, Nevada

  • 161015: Remarks at Toyota Portsmouth in Portsmouth, New Hampshire

  • 161102: Remarks at Central Florida Fairgrounds in Orlando, Florida

  • 161103: Remarks at the Bayfront Park Amphitheatre in Miami, Florida

  • 170228: President Donald Trump’s Speech to Joint Session of Congress (State of the Union)

  • 170428: President Donald Trump delivers his remarks at the National Rifle Association Leadership Forum at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia

  • 170728: Remarks by Trump to Law Enforcement on MS13 in Long Island, New York

  • 170802: Donald Trump Announces New Immigration Act, speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington

  • 170905: Trump’s Statement on Rescinding DACA, released by the White House

Context: In the second column, we present the context, which was selected after locating a portion of text in each speech. Our team reached a consensus interpretation of the target and source semantic domains of each text metaphor we located, along with sufficient context to justify the interpretation.

Token: The token column represents each metaphor instantiation we located and recorded with sufficient context so that its description in terms of source and target semantic domain could be independently confirmed. Additionally, we located the tokens of metaphor that were restated consistently throughout the speeches.

Target: The fourth column makes up the target semantic domain. Once all tokens were recorded into the table, the rows were sorted in terms of the target domains and edited so identical and nearly identical descriptions of rows could be made consistent.

Sources: Labeling the source domain is the final analysis informed by the targets. The descriptions in the source column constitutes a web of meanings that, in this case, Trump is consistently using to make sense of his world, and also to articulate that to other people.

Reduced Sources: The final column attends to the the previous column and simply reduces the source domain to fit into a larger image that can articulate the relationship between the target and meaning behind the source. The reduced sources allow us to understand Trump’s message under a straightforward description consisting of a few all-encompassing sources.